NANAHALLY RIVER

NANAHALLY RIVER (2000)

“Nashville is supposed to be a town of weasels and jackals, but then Chelle Rose walks onstage, sings plaintive sweet but jagged country soul music and smiles like Minnie Pearl. She sings it like she means it, most likely because she means it.”
-PETER COOPER, TENNESSEAN

“…of late, she’s shifted her sound from literate, contemplative acoustic-ish hillbilly Americana (think LORETTA LYNN pondering HEMINGWAY, or something like that) into something louder, bluesier and WHOLLY ROCKIN’ (think STEVE EARLE listening to the MARSHALL TUCKER BAND, while pondering LORETTA LYNN pondering HEMINGWAY, or something like that). Anyway, she’s a wise little heart-slicer and she makes good music.”
-PETER COOPER, TENNESSEAN

CHELLE ROSE creates EAST TENNESSEE country-rock with a moonshine kick and a mountain poets knack for being fearless, colorful and right on target.
-MICHAEL MCCALL, NASHVILLE SCENE

“To say that Rose creates acoustic folk-rock wouldn’t capture the fire or emotional release in her driving arrangements and unflinching lyrics…Rose is a mountain-raised East Tennessean with a big voice who, instead of playing country-rock, rocks like only a country gal can.”
-MICHAEL MCCALL, NASHVILLE SCENE CRITIC’S PICK

“Few heard it when it came out last fall, but Rose’s Nanahally River was one of the more luminous–and trenchant–coming-of-age albums to come along in years. A searching song-cycle steeped in mountains, rivers, secrets, and desire, the record–soulful roots-rock that runs the gamut from bluesy stomps to humid ballads to willowy twang–sounds like it just had to come out, if only to keep the East Tennessee native from bursting at the seams.”
-BILL FRISKICS-WARREN, NASHVILLE SCENE CRITIC’S PICK

“Chelle Rose writes and sings straight from the source and soul of country music. The Knoxville native’s debut CD, NANAHALLY RIVER, steers country back to its shady, summery home and its origins as soulful, gritty folktales that are as immediate and violently emotional as blues or jazz. Rather than attempting this through retro-traditionalist fare, Rose looks forward, punching out plain-spoken, gritty stuff with the OUTLAWS’ verve and LORETTA’S easy grace. She draws on her East Tennessee roots and her family history, while incorporating an alt-country penchant for distortion and strong backbeats. Her ballads are sweet and tinged with Appalachia and her rockers are, well, rockers. She’s by turns raucous and sedate, but always straightforward in her songwriting. Her recent radio success in the UK and Europe are hopeful signs of growing momentum. When compared to the dishonest, emotionless dreck belted out by most major-label country sirens, Rose’s work has the potential to be as long-lasting and meaningful as EMMYLOU or PATSY.”
-CLAY STEAKLEY, THE RAGE